Expand ER & Healthcare Handoffs to Treatment

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Return to ZOOM MAP - Improve Treatment & Enable Recovery for People with SUDs

  By systematically expanding processes for "warm handoffs" by Emergency Departments to treatment, recovery coaches and the other support needed by people who are misusing opioids, developing dependence or who have an SUD, many people will be more likely to get on the path for avoiding addiction or moving forward to long-term recovery.

Background

ER visits and hospitalizations due to opioid overdose is high and rising. "Overall, ED visits (reported by 52 jurisdictions in 45 states) for suspected opioid overdoses increased 30 percent in the U.S., from July 2016 through September 2017."[1]

More than 140,000 people visited an ER for overdoses nationwide between July 2016 and Sept. 2017, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.[2]

According to a May 2018 article, "Most ER doctors stabilize patients and release them with little or no attempt to offer long-term treatment."[3]

“Research shows that people who have had an overdose are more likely to have another. Emergency department education and post-overdose protocols, including providing naloxone and linking people to treatment, are critical needs,” said Alana Vivolo-Kantor, Ph.D., behavioral scientist in CDC’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. “Data on opioid overdoses treated in emergency departments can inform timely, strategic, and coordinated response efforts in the community as well.”[4]

Success Stories

Pioneering work in Rhode Island

The "warm handoff" model was pioneered in Rhode Island where all of the state’s emergency departments and hospitals were required to be state-certified to treat OUDs. The EDs must offer peer recovery support; prescribing the overdose reversal drug naloxone to at-risk patients; and offering MAT, including buprenorphine, in the ER or at a doctor’s office or treatment facility.  A study by Yale researchers found that opioid-addicted patients were more likely to get treatment and reduce opioid use long-term when started on medication-assisted treatment in the ER.https://www.centerforhealthjournalism.org/fellowships/projects/how-er-docs-could-play-key-role-fighting-opioid-epidemic 

 

Tools & Resources

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This white paper from HealthLeaders magazine, Recovery Begins in the ED, has good information. 
 
This 2018 report in the Annals of Emergency Medicine provides valuable details: Opportunities for Prevention and Intervention of Opioid Overdoses in the Emergency Department  
 
This webinar from March of 2018 goes into a lot of details on coordinating ER, Public Health and 
 

Scorecard Building

Potential Objective Details(Under Construction) 
Potential Measures and Data Sources(Under Construction) 

Actions to Take

Potential Actions and Partners

 

Resources to Investigate

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 PAGE MANAGER: [insert name here]
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Reviewer Date Comments
     

Sources

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  1. ^ Emergency Department Data Show Rapid Increases in Opioid Overdoses | CDC Online Newsroom | CDC. (2019, April 11). Retrieved December 5, 2019, from https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2018/p0306-vs-opioids-overdoses.html
  2. ^ How ER Docs Could Play A Key Role In Fighting The Opioid Epidemic | Center for Health Journalism. (n.d.). Retrieved December 5, 2019, from https://www.centerforhealthjournalism.org/fellowships/projects/how-er-docs-could-play-key-role-fighting-opioid-epidemic
  3. ^ How ER Docs Could Play A Key Role In Fighting The Opioid Epidemic | Center for Health Journalism. (n.d.). Retrieved December 5, 2019, from https://www.centerforhealthjournalism.org/fellowships/projects/how-er-docs-could-play-key-role-fighting-opioid-epidemic
  4. ^ Emergency Department Data Show Rapid Increases in Opioid Overdoses | CDC Online Newsroom | CDC. (2019, April 11). Retrieved December 5, 2019, from https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2018/p0306-vs-opioids-overdoses.html